Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue (Women of Action)

Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue (Women of Action)

Kathryn J. Atwood

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 1613745230

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


An Amelia Bloomer List Recommended Title

 

A VOYA Nonfiction Honor List Selection

 

Noor Inayat Khan was the first female radio operator sent into occupied France and transferred crucial messages. Johtje Vos, a Dutch housewife, hid Jews in her home and repeatedly outsmarted the Gestapo. Law student Hannie Schaft became involved in the most dangerous resistance work--sabotage, weapons transference, and assassinations. In these pages, young readers will meet these and many other similarly courageous women and girls who risked their lives to help defeat the Nazis.

            Twenty-six engaging and suspense-filled stories unfold from across Germany, Poland, the Netherlands, France, Belgium, Denmark, Great Britain, and the United States, providing an inspiring reminder of women and girls’ refusal to sit on the sidelines around the world and throughout history.

An overview of World War II and summaries of each country’s entrance and involvement in the war provide a framework for better understanding each woman’s unique circumstances, and resources for further learning follow each profile. Women Heroes of World War II is an invaluable addition to any student’s or history buff’s bookshelf.

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one day, they saved her life. During a roll call, a Nazi official was moving slowly through the rows of prisoners, looking at each prisoner intently. He stopped and looked at Andrée for a long moment. “Take that woman’s number,” he shouted, lashing at Andrée with his whip, “for the gas chamber!” A guard came up to Andrée and violently twisted her arm so that he could see the number tattooed on it. He wrote her number on a piece of paper, then walked away and placed the paper on a table

across an ocean to a strange land, but many things made her want to take the risk. One reason was the racism she experienced in the United States. Another was that she was always ready for an adventure. When she arrived in Paris, she was shocked to find that the producers wanted her to dance in skimpy outfits, some of which didn’t even cover her breasts. She had set her heart on being clothed in long, elegant gowns, not in costumes that only partially covered her body. But she was eventually

hear them knocking things over. If they found her radio, she would certainly be arrested. Her heart was beating so wildly, she was sure the soldiers could see it. Would they find the radio? Should she run? How far could she get before she was shot? Wild questions passed through her mind, but she remained outside with the soldiers as seconds passed into minutes. Finally, one of the men came down and handed something to his commanding officer. Virginia couldn’t see what it was. The officer looked

railroad lines that fanned out in many directions and connected with many different countries. The Germans knew that if they could destroy the center of these rail lines in Liége, it would greatly hinder the Allies’ ability to transport soldiers and equipment. And so the buzz bombs bombarded Liége, sometimes three at once from three different directions, coming every 15 minutes for two solid months. Some of the bombs landed directly on sections of the large tent hospital where Muriel and her

Belgium) (newspaper), 126, 137 Liége (Belgium), 143–44, 207–8, 210 Life in a Jar (play), 47 “Lili Marlene,” 215–17, 252 Lindbergh, Charles, 193 Lithuania, 36 L’ordre national (magazine), 61–62 Loustaunau-Lacau, Georges (Navarre), 61–64 Love, Nancy, 194 Lozeman, Aalt and Alie, 97, 99 Lund, Ebba, 158–60, 162–64 Lund, Ulla, 159 Luxembourg, 2, 89, 166 Lyon (France), 199 Maginot Line, 57 maquis. See maquisards maquisards (French Resistance fighters), 59, 177, 180–82, 185, 187, 196

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