Voyager: A Life of Hart Crane

Voyager: A Life of Hart Crane

John Eugene Unterecker

Language: English

Pages: 0

ISBN: 0374285683

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Farrar Straus Giriuyx 1969 1st 787 pp VG ins in DJ, DJ sp sunned

Fritz Lang: The Nature of the Beast

A Companion to Thomas Jefferson

A Journey Into Michelangelo's Rome

Confessions of a Mediocre Widow: Or, How I Lost My Husband and My Sanity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

that time in early winter when he "ran gait" at the factory "at the rate of fourteen hours straight per day of rushed and heavy and confusing labor," when he had been "very morose and irritable" under the "pressure of exertion, not to mention disgust and boredom," and had summed up his experiences neatly in a sentence: "Our age tries hard enough to kill us, but I begin to feel a pleasure in sheer stubbornness, and will possibly tum in time into some sort of a beautiful crank." With "no time,

his said mother, the board and lodging expenses of said son, shall be paid to said mother in behalf of said boy. With Grace occupied with legal matters and C.A. living at his club, Harold found the time of the divorce action not chaotic but peaceful. "With pipe, solitude and puppy for company," he wrote Schmitt, "I am feeling resplendent. Mter a day's work in a picture store selling mezzotints and prints, you may not think it, yet there comes a great peaceful exaltation in merely reading,

would have been tempted to make were it his own. If the two boys talked about poetry, they must have also talked about prose-and one prose work in particular; for a long letter from Crane in defense of Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man was printed-under the caption "Joyce and Ethics"in the then curre:at issue of The Little Review. Defending Joyce against the attacks of a "Los Angeles critic" in an earlier issue of the magazine, Crane particularly objected to the association of Joyce

publish in the issue of December 21 a long two-column interview. Crane took the interview lightly, describing it to Munson as "an agreeable joke and an anachronism in Akron," as "silly enough, but forced upon me, and misquotations as well," but his father saw it as a not-so-veiled attack upon all he held most dear. "The pater was furious," Crane told Munson, "at the headlines in particular, and I spent a nervous day yesterday with him in explanations etc. Sic semper." The headline, Millionaire's

These men have recognized realities that are close to us and our present day life, and we cannot afford to ignore them." A Life of Hart Crane I I9I9 I 57 It was up to the artist, then, to achieve a precarious balance between the tough-minded business community and an equally tough-minded fraternity of critics of that community. The artist had to cultivate a deliberately split personality. He had to be "two different people," as Crane told his interviewer. One of his lives, if it was to be

Download sample

Download