The Emergence of Modern China

The Emergence of Modern China

Jean-Luc Domenach

Language: English

Pages: 285

ISBN: 2:00160830

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The Emergence of Modern China (Google eBook)

Jean-Luc Domenach
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Columbia University Press, Jan 1, 2012 - Business & Economics - 192 pages
Based on his experience as a scholar and diplomat stationed in China, Jean-Luc Domenach consults a wealth of archival and recent materials to examine China's contemporary and future place in the world. A sympathetic yet critical observer, Domenach brings his intimate knowledge of the country to bear on a range of critical issues, such as the growth (or deterioration) of China's economy, the government's ever-delayed democratization, the potential outcomes of a national political crisis, and the possible escalation of a revamped authoritarianism. Domenach ultimately reads China's current progress as a set of easy accomplishments presaging a more difficult era of development to come. His finely nuanced analysis captures the difficult decisions now confronting China's elite, who are under tremendous pressure to support an economy based on innovation and consumption, establish a political system based on law and popular participation, rethink their national identity and spatial organization, and define a more positive approach to the world's problems. These leaders are also besieged by corruption among their ranks, an increasingly restless urban population, and a sharp decline in the country's demographic growth. Domenach uniquely taps into these anxieties and the attempt to alleviate them, revealing a China much less confident and secure than many would believe.
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Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Measure for Measure
CHINA MOVES TOWARD A CONSUMER ECONOMY
In a NewWorld
The Magnitude and Weaknesses of Growth
4
5
Can China Be Governed?
One People? 8 Will ChinaFinally
Chinas Great Challenge
NOTES
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

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Bibliographic information

Title The Emergence of Modern China
Author Jean-Luc Domenach
Publisher Columbia University Press, 2012
ISBN 0231526458, 9780231526456
Length 192 pages
Subjects Political Science › World › Asian

Business & Economics / Economic Conditions
Political Science / World / Asian
Social Science / Sociology / General

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worst.23 What will happen with this fever? What will be the effects of the world stock market crisis that began in January 74 2008? No one knows, but international financial circles are on the alert. These banking and stock market failings make the other weaknesses connected to the influence of the international economic situation on the Chinese economy even more dangerous. The condition of the economy is such that the country would perhaps not withstand a crisis comparable to the one that

educational level and increasing concern with the economy are unquestionably positive elements. Engineering education was preferred during the first two decades of economic growth. It seems that legal degrees are favored today, which fits with recent attention paid to social questions: most new entrants into the Politburo have law degrees, including Xi Jinping and Li Keqiang, between whom the succession to Hu Jintao will be settled.10 However, for them as for most other officials, their time in

the party apparatus. In fact, at the Seventeenth Congress he won only a narrow victory over the “Shanghai” faction and had to compensate for a victory in economic policy with a compromise on the identity of his successor. If the current hierarchical order is maintained, this will not be his candidate, Li Keqiang, but precisely the current boss of Shanghai, Xi Jinping, which casts doubt on the future application of Hu’s policy. That means that Hu Jintao still has to compromise with one of the most

certain rights associated with nationality, and free participation in civic activities. Putting it mildly, civic equality is incomplete in China. The population is divided into two worlds, the city and the country; the former permits but the latter does not, or does very little, access to housing and the most modern professions, to 175 money, and to travel. Only inhabitants of the first world can be citizens, but the twofold caste of party members and the wealthy have many ways of avoiding the

the fierce Chinese desire for money and leisure but illustrate it with amusing or even ridiculous anecdotes, ones typical of a supposedly naïve practice of capitalism. But where is the naïveté? Chinese workers and consumers fully understand how the system in which they are living operates. They fully understand its harshness and have adapted to it, but they never miss an opportunity to enjoy its advantages. I might add another anecdote, a moving and significant one. In the bedding section of an

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