Pitt Cue Co. the Cookbook

Pitt Cue Co. the Cookbook

Tom Adams, Jamie Berger

Language: English

Pages: 158

ISBN: B01K94NIJ6

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Now you can enjoy the sublime. smoky and slow-cooked meats from one of the most celebrated London restaurants. Pitt Cue Co. Filled with recipes for the hot. Southern US-style. slow-cooked food that made Londoners queue up. this cookbook allows you to bring the must-try restaurant home.The recipes range from their famous Pickle Backs and Bourbon cocktail to their acclaimed Pulled Pork Shoulder or Chipotle & Garlic Confit Slaw. The Pitt Cue Co. Cookbook is your guide to enjoying the best hot. tender. sticky Americana inspired grub all year round. With information from the expert chefs at Pitt Cue Co. on equipment and methods. and recipes for meats . sauces and rubs. this is your guide to irresistibly delicious food to savor and share.Try out recipes like Smoked Rib of Beef and Bourbon Bone

Pierogi: More Than a Book, Less Than a National Taste Guide

Gourmet Vegetarian Slow Cooker: Simple and Sophisticated Meals from Around the World

Food in Jars: Preserving in Small Batches Year-Round

Sizzling Skillets and Other One-Pot Wonders

Grill It!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PERFECT RATIO OF MUSCLE TO FAT, WITH MUCH THE SAME SOFTNESS IN THE MUSCLE AS THE BEST END OF THE LOIN TO WHICH THEY JOIN, BUT ARE AN ALL-ROUND MORE FLAVOURSOME PROPOSITION. THE SHOULDER USUALLY PROVIDES SIX OR SEVEN 300G CHOPS, DEPENDING ON THE BREED AND SIZE OF PIG, AND AT THE RESTAURANT WE BREAK IT DOWN IN TWO WAYS: INTO CHOPS, OR INTO TWO LARGER JOINTS THAT EQUATE TO THREE CHOPS EACH. THESE TWO LARGER JOINTS FROM THE SHOULDER MAKE A PERFECT SHARING PLATE AND ARE LARGE ENOUGH TO BE SMOKED

(see The Set-Up) and set the temperature to 110°C. Be careful about using too much smoke as this can overpower the lamb. To prepare the lamb, remove the skin from the top of the rump being careful not to rip off the fat with it. Rub the lamb all over with the lamb rub and put it, fat side up, inside your barbecue. Smoke for 30–45 minutes, or until the internal temperature reaches 50–52°C. Remove from the barbecue and leave to rest while you adjust your barbecue for direct grilling. Season the

in a restaurant. Unfortunately, though, when it comes to barbecue, they are often neglected. Barbecue, as culture and technique, is based upon meat and the cooking of it over fire, so the neglect of side dishes is not entirely surprising. However, this neglect is a grave shame; for us, barbecue most definitely requires some satisfying respite and clean juxtapositions to the main meaty event. Side dishes are there to provide this balance. The side dishes we have eaten on our trips to Texas, the

THIS SALAD OWES ITS PLACE TO SEAN, THE MOST AMAZING VEG GROWER AND ALL-ROUND LEGEND, WHOSE FARM IS IN CORNWALL. ONE DAY, OUT OF THE BLUE, A PACKAGE ARRIVED AT PITT CUE ADDRESSED TO ‘MAJOR TOM’ CONTAINING LOTS OF SWEET LITTLE TOMATOES AND PEPPERY NASTURTIUMS. THESE ARE PARTICULARLY GOOD SERVED WITH SMOKED MEAT. SERVES 3–4 bulbs of fennel 2 apples, cored 2 nasturtium leaves 60g sweet cherry tomatoes, halved 10 Poor Man’s Capers 20g Mead Salad Dressing Maldon sea salt freshly ground black

grilling, about 150˚C. Chop 5mm off the base of the pear so that it sits flat, with the flesh exposed on the bottom. Dip the exposed base into the caster sugar, then place the pear on buttered greaseproof paper on the grill and close the lid. Cook for 30 minutes, until the pear is soft and the skin has begun to shrivel. Remove from the heat and set aside. Put half the strawberries into a pan and add the balsamic vinegar, orange zest, lemon juice and 10g of the caster sugar. Cook over a gentle

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