My Inventions: and Other Writings (Dover Thrift Editions)

My Inventions: and Other Writings (Dover Thrift Editions)

Language: English

Pages: 144

ISBN: 0486807215

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


One of science's great unsung heroes, Nikola Tesla (1856–1943) was a prophet of the electronic age. His research laid much of the groundwork for modern electrical and communication systems, and his impressive accomplishments include development of the alternating-current electrical system, radio, the Tesla coil transformer, wireless transmission, and fluorescent lighting. Yet his name and work are only dimly recognized today: Tesla's research was so groundbreaking that many of his contemporaries failed to understand it, and other scientists are unjustly credited for his innovations.
The visionary scientist speaks for himself in this volume, originally published in 1919 as a six-part series in Electrical Experimenter magazine. Tesla recounts his boyhood in Croatia, his schooling and work in Europe, his collaboration with Thomas Edison, and his subsequent research. This edition includes the essay "The Problem of Increasing Human Energy: With Special Reference to the Harnessing of the Sun's Energy," which anticipates latter-day advances in environmental technology. Written with wit and élan, this memoir offers fascinating insights into one of the great minds of modern science.

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to nothing of air pressure, but instinctively I felt for the suction hose in the water and found that it had collapsed. When I waded in the river and opened it up the water rushed forth and not a few Sunday clothes were spoiled. Archimedes running naked thru the streets of Syracuse and shouting Eureka at the top of his voice did not make a greater impression than myself. I was carried on the shoulders and was the hero of the day. Upon settling in the city I began a four-years’ course in the

all, an inventor, and we would never deign to question the reality of one of his patents. When originally published in the pages of The Electrical Experimenter, “My Inventions” mingled with an astonishing variety of colorful articles: “Soldiers’ Ills Cured by Electricity,” “Will Man Freeze the Earth to Death?”, “Women Now Trained as Meter Maids,” “Wood Finishing for the Amateur,” and “Home Experiments in Radio-Activity.” One Electrical Experimenter editorial states, “Conditions on Mars we know

absence of streamers surprised me, and it was not long before I discovered that this was due to the position of the turns and their mutual action. Profiting from this observation I resorted to the use of a high tension conductor with turns of considerable diameter sufficiently separated to keep down the distributed capacity, while at the same time preventing undue accumulation of the charge at any point. The application of this principle enabled me to produce pressures of 4,000,000 volts, which

of rest and how she passed away after weeks of agony! It was especially remarkable that during all this period of partially obliterated memory I was fully alive to everything touching on the subject of my research. I could recall the smallest details and the least insignificant observations in my experiments and even recite pages of text and complex mathematical formulae. My belief is firm in a law of compensation. The true rewards are ever in proportion to the labor and sacrifices made. This is

easy to get rid of them by receiving without aerials. But, as a matter of fact, a wire buried in the ground which, conforming to this view, should be absolutely immune, is more susceptible to certain extraneous impulses than one placed vertically in the air. To state it fairly, a slight progress has been made, but not by virtue of any particular method or device. It was achieved simply by discarding the enormous structures, which are bad enough for transmission but wholly unsuitable for

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