Chicken and Rice: Fresh and Easy Southeast Asian Recipes from a London Kitchen

Chicken and Rice: Fresh and Easy Southeast Asian Recipes from a London Kitchen

Shu Han Lee

Language: English

Pages: 180

ISBN: 0241199077

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Southeast Asian food is fresh, easy and full of unforgettable flavours: Chicken and Rice will show you just how simple it is to make at home.
Shu Han Lee moved to London from Singapore as a student. Homesick and hungry, she started teaching herself to cook the food she'd grown up with - Singaporean and Malaysian dishes, with a strong Chinese influence from her Hokkien Chinese mother.
These recipes, from her mother's sesame oil chicken to ox cheek and venison rendang, are ones you will want to make time and time again.
There are perfect midweek suppers rustled up in less time than it takes to order a takeaway, and healthier and better tasting at that: fennel and minced pork stir fry, fried hor fun noodles with kale and beansprouts or tom yum soup with mussels.

For weekends, there are more adventurous projects: learn how to make your own steamed buns, egg noodles, or BBQ sambal lemon sole - a whole fish barbequed on banana leaves. Although these are Southeast Asian recipes, Shu's seasonal approach to the very best of UK produce is reflected throughout this book: from Brussels sprouts with smashed garlic and oyster sauce to no-churn rhubarb and condensed milk ice cream.

There are also recipes that Shu has picked up on her travels throughout Southeast Asia, such as Vietnamese caramel pork ribs, Thai baked glass noodles with prawns and black pepperand Burmese chickpea tofu with fish sauce, lime and honey dressing.

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chillies fresh coriander Put the dried chillies into a sieve. Using a pair of kitchen scissors, snip them and shake the sieve vigorously to remove most of the chilli seeds. Soak in warm water for 20 minutes, until soft, then drain and discard the water. In a separate bowl, soak the tamarind in 150ml of hot water for 15 minutes, until softened. Massage and squeeze to get the juices from the pulp, then discard the pulp.Meanwhile, wash the pork belly and cut it crosswise into 2.5cm chunks. Roughly

a soft dough. Cover the dough and set aside while you prepare the coconut coating. Combine the grated coconut and salt. Place in a steamer along with the pandan leaves and steam for 10 minutes, then remove and discard the pandan leaves. Meanwhile, chop or pound the gula melaka finely. Divide the dough into 12–15 balls. Flatten one of the balls between your palms, and place a teaspoon of gula melaka in the centre. Seal the edges and roll it between your palms to shape it into a ball again. Set

CHILLI SHRIMP OIL I drizzle this on top of anything that needs perking up: blanched egg noodles, poached chicken or fried eggs. For an extra umami kick, add dried shrimps. Makes a 350ml jar 30g dried red chillies 30g dried shrimps (optional) 250ml groundnut oil a pinch of sea salt Finely chop or blitz the dried red chillies and dried shrimps (if using) in a food processor until they are in small pieces. Heat the oil in a saucepan on a medium heat and add the dried chillies, along with the

CHILLI SHRIMP OIL I drizzle this on top of anything that needs perking up: blanched egg noodles, poached chicken or fried eggs. For an extra umami kick, add dried shrimps. Makes a 350ml jar 30g dried red chillies 30g dried shrimps (optional) 250ml groundnut oil a pinch of sea salt Finely chop or blitz the dried red chillies and dried shrimps (if using) in a food processor until they are in small pieces. Heat the oil in a saucepan on a medium heat and add the dried chillies, along with the

mostly used to make sauces and dressings, and can be found readily in supermarkets. 32. Black rice vinegar Black rice vinegar is, well, black, as its name suggests, and has a more complex, sweet and smoky flavour that’s somewhat similar to balsamic vinegar. It is made from fermenting black glutinous rice and its rich taste is what adds depth to much punchier sauces and stews. 33. Shaoxing rice wine This is a shelf-stable cooking rice wine, so it’s handy to have a bottle ready in your

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