Chasing the Ripper (Kindle Single)

Chasing the Ripper (Kindle Single)

Patricia Cornwell

Language: English

Pages: 47

ISBN: B00PKOPENE

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


In 2001, #1 New York Times bestselling crime novelist Patricia Cornwell was pulled into a real-life investigation of her own—the long-unsolved and deeply unsettling “Jack the Ripper” murders that mesmerized London in the late 1800s. Applying modern science and forensic techniques to a century-old crime, Cornwell’s research led to the publication of Portrait of a Killer, in which she identified the renowned British painter Walter Sickert as the Ripper. The book became a #1 bestseller but also embroiled Cornwell in controversy as Ripperologists dismissed her claims and her credibility. But for Cornwell, the book was only the beginning. For more than a decade, Cornwell has devoted countless hours and invested millions in her pursuit of new evidence against Sickert. Now, twelve years later, Cornwell revisits the most notorious unsolved crime in history—determined to solve the mystery once and for all.

In this exclusive Kindle Single, Cornwell restates her case against Sickert, unveils new evidence, clarifies his motivations, and makes him human—and, along the way, explains how such a prominent cultural figure could be a notorious killer. She also directly faces down her critics with withering skill and, in doing so, is likely to re-ignite the debate over history’s most heinous unsolved crime.

Chasing the Ripper offers a surprisingly personal and revealing look into what it has been like for Cornwell to pursue the most sensational murder case in criminal history—even as she continues to thrill her fans with a steady diet of new Scarpetta novels, including Flesh and Blood, her latest New York Times bestseller.

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couldn’t have murdered anyone, because he has an alibi. He was in France in the late summer and fall when the early Ripper crimes began. FACT: This is patently untrue. Sickert may have been in France often, but he wasn’t away from London when every Ripper murder occurred. Sickert’s own music-hall sketches in pencil on small pieces of cheap notepaper place him in London’s East End at music halls within days or even hours of at least three killings associated with the Ripper. Dates he wrote on

and scientific continues to point to him. This doesn’t mean that anyone will ever prove he actually committed murder. Simply summarized, we can’t place him at a crime scene. But we might be able to place an artist at one. Evidence not noticed before now has revealed something baffling inside the room where Mary Kelly was butchered on November 9, 1888. Her case in particular haunts me. Despite decades of autopsies and crime scenes, I can honestly say I’ve never encountered the extreme brutality

the risk of being pursued by a mob. What caused the police to take notice of these hapless individuals to begin with? I’ve concluded that the Ripper himself had a lot to do with it. An aspect of this case I didn’t realize early on is that his diabolical antics included more than just his very public taunts. He also enjoyed cooking up mayhem, uproars and other chaotic concoctions. He deliberately implicated certain individuals in homicides he in fact committed. He disrupted, damaged and ruined

“snobs” if he could use them. He adored spying on the wretches of the slums if they fueled his dark, violent fantasies. He craved accolades and the company of celebrities. In later life he was awarded an honorary doctorate from Reading University. He would give painting lessons to Winston Churchill. His art hung in royal palaces. He inspired biographies and was honored with commemorative plaques on the sides of buildings he once inhabited. It’s hard to envision Jack the Ripper as a workingman, a

“snobs” if he could use them. He adored spying on the wretches of the slums if they fueled his dark, violent fantasies. He craved accolades and the company of celebrities. In later life he was awarded an honorary doctorate from Reading University. He would give painting lessons to Winston Churchill. His art hung in royal palaces. He inspired biographies and was honored with commemorative plaques on the sides of buildings he once inhabited. It’s hard to envision Jack the Ripper as a workingman, a

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