Beatrix Potter: A Life in Nature

Beatrix Potter: A Life in Nature

Language: English

Pages: 608

ISBN: 1250094194

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


In this now classic biography, reissued in a new edition for the 150th anniversary of Beatrix Potter's birth, Linda Lear offers the astonishing portrait of an extraordinary woman who gave us some of the most beloved children's books of all time. Potter found freedom from her conventional Victorian upbringing in the countryside. Nature inspired her imagination as an artist and scientific illustrator, but The Tale of Peter Rabbit brought her fame, financial success, and the promise of happiness when she fell in love with her editor Norman Warne. After his tragic and untimely death, Potter embraced a new life as the owner of Hill Top Farm in the English Lake District and a second chance at happiness. As a visionary landowner, successful farmer and sheep-breeder, she was able to preserve the landscape that had inspired her art.

Beatrix Potter: A Life in Nature reveals a lively, independent, and passionate woman, whose art was timeless, and whose generosity left an indelible imprint on the countryside. This anniversary edition is complete with a brand new foreword by James Rebanks, the Lake District shepherd and social media sensation who chronicles his world on Twitter and in his wonderful book, "A Shepherd's Life".

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Peter Rabbit Fund, asked Beatrix if she would contribute a Christmas card for the charity to use as a ‘reward for collectors’. Beatrix thought it a worthwhile venture, and Warne’s agreed to contribute the coloured block and produce the card. The first card was ready by Christmas 1924, but was not published until the following year. Between 1925 and 1941 Beatrix regularly produced perhaps as many as two dozen cards, featuring delightful animals, not always rabbits, that helped raise money for four

1894), 364–5; (11 November 1895), 408; (16 January 189)) 417. 58 Eileen Jay and Jenny Hall, A Tale of London Past: Beatrix Potter’s Archaeological Paintings from the Armitt Collection (1990). The archaeological drawings are part of the Potter collection at LDM@TA and were given by Beatrix in April 1935 together with two sketch maps and her notes on their provenance. Sadly, the original artefacts have disappeared. 59 Eileen Jay, ‘Beatrix Potter’s Archaeology’, VN, 49–54. VN, 153. Ruskin

to observe Beatrix’s artwork over a crucial period. Both he and Lucy admired the Christmas cards and place-cards Beatrix made for the family in 1889. Beatrix recalled that ‘the cards were put under the plates at breakfast and proved a five minutes wonder’. Roscoe was aware that Beatrix and Bertram both ‘had a desire for coin’ in order to purchase a printing machine that cost £16 and that they were short of that amount by £6. He suggested that her cards were of such quality that ‘any publisher

whether I grow it or not, I stick to it.)’ It was clear to her that this underground form must be the means by which fungi ‘get from log to log without cups to spore’. Beatrix hypothesized that ‘all the higher fungi have probably a mould’, and that if there were individual moulds, all of which could be sprouted with time and patience, there were ‘enormously more moulds than have been specified’.24 Undoubtedly she shared her observations with McIntosh, as well as the fact that she was

doll’s house furniture and a box of doll’s house food on platters. ‘I received the parcel from Hamley’s this morning; the things will all do beautifully,’ Beatrix replied happily, ‘the ham’s appearance is enough to cause indigestion. I am getting almost more treasures than I can squeeze into one small book.’ The furniture and the food inspired some of her best illustrations, including a back view of Hunca Munca mercilessly chopping away at the indigestible plaster ham! Regardless of parental

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